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Waltham Abbey
Essex

East of England

Bury Road, Sewardstonebury
(Gilwell Park Scout Activity Centre)

The Boy Scout

considered to be "The Unknown Scout"
Robert Tait McKenzie
Modern Art Foundry (New York)
1966 (1937)

Waltham Abbey /  The Boy Scout   Waltham Abbey /  The Boy Scout

Description

Statue of a boy scout, considered to be the "Unknown Scout":
According to a legend, William Boyce was lost on a foggy street in London in 1909 when an unknown Scout came to his aid, guiding him to his destination. The boy then refused Boyce's tip, explaining that he was a Boy Scout and was merely doing his daily good turn. Soon thereafter, Boyce met with General Baden-Powell, who was Chief Scout at the time. Boyce returned to America, and, four months later, founded the Boy Scouts of America on February 8, 1910. This unknown boy scout was awarded in 1926 the second Silver Buffalo Award by the American boy scouts (see here).

In fact, the statue is a replica of McKenzie's most famous sculpture, The Ideal Scout (1937), also known as The Boy Scout, placed in front of the Cradle of Liberty Council in Philadelphia in 1937 (it stood there until 2013).

Gilwell Park is the Scout Association's national headquarters. It is located in Sewardstonebury, belonging to Waltham Abbey, Essex, although usually the address is given as (North) London.

Inscription(s)

THE BOY SCOUT
by robert tait-mckenzie
presented to GILWELL PARK
by the PHILADELPHIA COUNCIL
BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
as a symbol of international brotherhood
MAY 7th 1966

Signature

R. Tait McKenzie. 1937
modern art foundry new york n.y. u.s.a.

Sculptor

Sources & Information

Tags

Location (N 51°38'53" - E 0°0'7")

Item Code: gbee117; Photograph: 17 March 2019
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