France

Statues - Hither & Thither

Site Search:
Metz
Moselle

Lorraine

Place Jean-Paul II
(Cathédrale Saint-Étienne)

Sculptures sur la Cathédrale

Sculptures at the Cathedral

Auguste Dujardin
1874-1903

Metz /  Sculptures sur la Cathédrale   Metz /  Sculptures sur la Cathédrale

Description

The building of the cathedral began in 1220 was completed around 1520.
In 1755, French architect Jacques-François Blondel was awarded by the Royal Academy of Architecture to build a Neoclassical portal at the West end of the cathedral. He disengaged the cathedral's facade by razing an adjacent cloister and three attached churches and achieved the westwork in 1764.
In 1877, the cathedral was heavily damaged after a conflagration due to fireworks. After this incident, it was decided to refurbish the cathedral and its adornments in a Neogothic style, the architect was Paul Tornow and the sculptor Auguste Dujardin. The western facade was completely rebuilt between 1898 and 1903; Blondel's portal was demolished and a new Neogothic portal was added. The statues of Faith and Hope from Blondel's were placed in two churches in Saint-Avold (see Faith and Hope).

There are numerous large and small statues and reliefs on the exterior of the cathedral. We have only photographed the larger statues and reliefs.

Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
1. Portal du Christ
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
3. Portail de la Vierge

1. Portail du Christ / Portal of Christ

Designed and executed by the architect Paul Tornow and the sculptor Auguste Dujardin, 1898-1903.

Trumeau
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Christ, standing on a lion and a dragon, making a blessing gesture and holding the bible.
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
King David
(c. 1040-970 BCE), second king of the United Kingdom of Israel, and an ancestor of Jesus (Wikipedia)

Tympan

Metz - Monument aux morts de 1914-18
Jugement Dernier / the Last Judgement

Jamb statues, left
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Three apostles
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Three apostles, St. Peter to the right.
Jamb statues, right
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Three apostles, St. Paul to the left
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Three apostles
Statues in the porch
In the porch are statues of four holy bishops of Metz: Clemens, Arnulf, Chrodegang, and Firminus (two of these are unvisible from the street). At the small sides of the porch are statues of St. Stephen, patron of the church, and St. Paul, patron of the chapter.
Left Right
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Étienne / St. Stephen, protomartyr (Wikipedia)
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
One of the bishops of Metz
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Paul the Apostle, (c. 5 - c. 67 ), persecuted the early followers of Jesus before switching sides and seeking to join them. He was instrumental in creating the Christian Church. He is the protector of tent-makers, theologians and the ecclesiastical press and is depicted with a sword. (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
One of the bishops of Metz
Buttresses: Four prophets
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Isaïe / Isaiah, prophet (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Jérémie / Jeremiah, prophet (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Ezéchiel / Ezekiel, prophet (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Daniel, protagonist in the Book of Daniel of the Bible (Wikipedia). The prophet had originally the face of Emperor William II, see below

For the statue of Daniel the sculptor used the face of Emperor William II as his model. Shortly after World War I the hands of the statue were handcufffed and a scroll with the text 'Sic transit gloria mundi' was added. Several postcards were made of this situation, although handcuffs and sign were soon removed. Later, the sculptor removed the mustache so that the resemblance with the emperor was less obvious. - In the report of the inauguration in the Dutch newspaper De Tijd of 17 May 1903 however was written that the statue had no mustache.

2. (South-)West façade

Gable
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Christ King
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Michel / St. Michael the Archangel, the field commander of the Army of God. He is often depicted slaying Satan represented as a dragon, and with a shield with text quis ut deus (Who is like God?, a literal translation of the name Michael). (Wikipedia).

Clock
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Angels flanking the clock, above the clock an angel with a shield with the year 1897

Turrets flanking the west window
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
L'Église / The Church (Wikipedia)
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
La Synagogue / The Synagogue (Wikipedia)

3. Portail de la Vierge ou Notre-Dame / Portal of the Virgin

Restored by the architect Paul Tornow and the sculptor Auguste Dujardin, 1876, who probably had made most of the statues in his workshop.

Trumeau Tympan
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Notre Dame
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(top) Le Couronnement de Marie / The Coronation of Mary
(center) la Dormition / the Dormition
(bottom) La réunion des Apôtres / The meeting of the Apostles

Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
L'Église / The Church
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Mathieu / St. Matthew one of the twelve Apostles of Jesus and one of the four Evangelists. His attribute is an angel. As patron saint of book-keepers, tax collectors and security forces, he is also depicted with writing utensils (Wikipedia).
St. Marc / St. Mark one the four Evangelists. His attribute is a lion (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Luc / St. Luke one of the four Evangelists. His attribute is an ox or bull, usually having wings (Wikipedia).
St. Jean l'évangéliste / St. John the Evangelist conventional name for the author of the Gospel of John - considered to be the same person as John the Apostle (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
La Synagogue / The Synagogue, blindfolded woman

Jamb statues, left
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Clement of Metz / St. Clément de Metz first bishop of Metz, 3rd century. He holds the dragon Graoully on a chain (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Grégoire I / St. Gregory I, pope 590-604 (Wikipedia)
St. Hélène / St. Helena, the consort of the Roman emperor Constantius Chlorus and the mother of the emperor Constantine the Great (Wikipedia)
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Étienne / St. Stephen, protomartyr (Wikipedia)
St. Cécile / St. Cecilia, patron saint of musicians and Church music because as she was dying she sang to God (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Jean Baptiste / St. John the Baptist (c. 6 BC- c. 36 AD), itinerant preacher and a major religious figure who led a movement of baptism at the Jordan River. He baptized Jesus at "Bethany beyond the Jordan." (Wikipedia).
St. Anne / St. Ann mother of the Virgin Mary. She is often depicted with Mary as a child or a young girl (Wikipedia).
Jamb statues, right
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Joachim, the husband of Saint Anne and the father of Mary, the mother of Jesus (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Joseph, the husband of the Virgin Mary and the earthly father of Jesus Christ (in distinction to God, his "heavenly father") (Wikipedia).
Ste. Lucie / St. Lucy (283-304), martyr (Wikipedia)
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Laurent / St. Lawrence, (c. 225 - 258), one of the seven deacons of ancient Rome who were martyred during the persecution of Valerian. Usually holding a gridiron and wearing a dalmatic (Wikipedia).
Ste. Monique / St. Monica (4th century), mother of St. Augustine of Hippo (Wikipedia)
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Jerôme (c. 347-420), theologian and historian (Wikipedia)
St. Arnoul / St. Arnulf of Metz (c. 582-640), bishop of Metz, 613-628 (Wikipedia)
Above the jamb statues
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(top) Jugement Dernier / the Last Judgement
(bottom left) Résurrection / Resurrection
(bottom right) Ascension
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
13th century:
(top) Crucifixion
(bottom left) Flagellation du Christ / Flagellation of Christ,
(bottom right) Montée au Calvaire / Ascent of the Calvary
Top corners
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(left, stair tower)
Angel with sundial
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(top left) King
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(top right) King

4. Side Chapel

South buttress North buttress
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Man with flute
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Man with bagpipe
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Man with unidentified musical instrument
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Man with small guitar
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Man with mandoline
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Girl with mandoline

Balustrade of the Side Chapel

Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Angel with trumpet
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Angel with censer
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Angel with sun
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Angel with portrait medaillon
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Angel with censer
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Angel with flute

5. Portail Saint-Étienne (portail nord de Notre-Dame la-Ronde) / St. Stephen's Portal

Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale

Reliefs from the 13th century, restored and partially replaced in the 19th century.
Left: bestiaires
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Bestiaire et morale (analysis).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Le bestiaire de Thèbes (analysis).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
La bestialité de l’Homme (analysis).
Right: (identifcation after Normand 2012)
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Top: square 1-4 David and Goliath; square 5 Lamech kills Cain
Bottom: David's battle with the Amalekites or the life of St. Maurice
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
The discovery of the Holy Cross by St. Helena and St. Constantin. The last square shows the conversion of St. Paul
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(top) The History of St. Margareth (bottom) The Martyre of St. Stephen

6. Portal of the Bell tower

Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Étienne / St. Stephen, protomartyr (Wikipedia)
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Reliefs

7. Bell tower and Buttresses

Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Crucifix, sculpted in 1894 by Dujardin.
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
St. Pierre / St. Peter
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
Christ and ?
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale

8. South Transept

Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale

Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(Left pinnacle)
St. Nicolas / St. Nicholas (4th century), Bishop of Myra (Wikipedia).
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(top of gable above window)
St. Étienne / St. Stephen, protomartyr (Wikipedia). Signed: Renn fec.
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(Right pinnacle)
Saint with church model

9. North Transept; 10. Roof

Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(top of gable) La Vierge à l'Enfant
Metz - Sculptures sur la Cathédrale
(rooftop) Angel with trumpet

Old Postcard(s)

 
Click on the thumbnail for an enlargement.

Sculptor

Sources & Information

Tags

  • Clement of Metz, St.
  • Crucifiction
  • Crucifix
  • Daniel
  • David (king)
  • Dujardin, Auguste
  • Ecclesia and Synagoga
  • Evangelists (Four)
  • Ezekiel
  • Façade with statues (church)
  • Goliath
  • Gregory the Great, St.
  • Helena, St.
  • Isaiah
  • Jeremiah
  • Jerôme, St.
  • Joachim, St.
  • John the Baptist, St.
  • John the Evangelist, St.
  • Joseph, St.
  • Last Judgement
  • Lawrence, St.
  • Lucy, St.
  • Luke, St.
  • Mark, St.
  • Mary with Child
  • Matthew, St.
  • Michael, St.
  • Monica, St.
  • Musician
  • Nicholas, St.
  • Paul, St.
  • Resurrection
  • Stephen, St.
  • Synagogue (allegory)
  • Tympanum
  • Wilhelm II (emperor)
  • Location (N 49°7'12" - E 6°10'31")

    Item Code: frlo177; Photograph: 27 May 2019
    Of each statue we made photos from various angles and also detail photos of the various texts.
    If you want to use photos, please contact us via the contact form (in Dutch, English or German).
    © Website and photos: René & Peter van der Krogt